haiku, seasons

Deciduous

My response to a CDHK challenge about leafless trees is a haiku attributing lungs to such trees.  Why not?
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

Deciduous
|Lifeless? No, leafless.
|Trees hold their breath all winter,
|exhale leaves in spring.

birds, food, haiku, humor, seasons

Spring from Another Viewpoint

A few seconds near the end of the delightful music video from a CDHK episode have inspired a haiku that looks at a familiar subject from an unfamiliar viewpoint.
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

I consulted the plants in my yard for my first response to

Carpe Diem Special #194
A Trip Along Memory Lane — with a twist
,

but I did not consult my plants this time.  They might be shocked.

Spring from Another Viewpoint
|One fat little bird
|welcomes spring in its own way.
|Cherry buds are food.

haiku, photography, seasons

Spring

The plants in my yard have a response to the cherry blossom video shown in CDHK #194.  After the winter, green plants spring back to savor warmth and longer days.  Hmmm.  That’s a haiku.
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

Carpe Diem Special #194
A Trip Along Memory Lane — with a twist
.

green-peek_934x657

daffodil-leaves_934x900

Spring
|After the winter,
|green plants spring back to savor
|warmth and longer days.

humor, photography, science, seasons, serendipity

Serendipity with Squid

Did I superimpose 2 images to create a (clumsy) visual metaphor about the interconnectedness of life?  Nope.  The story begins millions of miles away.  It ends on a window pane.
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

HeronSquid_581x684Hmmm?  A ghostly translucent squid seems to hover in midair between the viewer and nesting herons.  No, I did not combine a heron image with a squid image in my photo editor.

The story begins millions of miles away, where the sun emits photons even more copiously than the pols emit factoids.  Minutes later, a tiny fraction of the photons bounce off a neighbor’s window, pass thru my window, and hit me in the eye.  There are many ways I would love to emulate people like Bach or Galileo; going blind is not one of them.

Yes, I could pull the drapes. But only a small portion of my window needs to be obscured.  Would rather not waste winter sunshine.  Yes, I could buy a window decal.  Most of the decals I have seen are cutesy.  The rest make a statement:

I am as ugly as a warthog with zits,
but the jerk who owns this dump
bought me as a decoration.  Ha!

Of course, I am dissing only the decals I have seen, not any other decal U may have and like.

The Dec/Jan 2016 issue of National Wildlife magazine has photos from the annual NWF photo contest, including a photo of nesting herons by Mario Labado and a photo of a squid by Jackie Reid.  I read the magazine on paper (yes, I am that old), and it so happens that the photos are on opposite sides of the same thin sheet, w/o much else to clutter what is seen when bright light passes thru.  The fraction of duplex printed sheets that look at all good when both sides are seen at once is like the fraction of photons emitted by the sun that bounce off my neighbor’s window:  tiny.

So I cut out the sheet and taped it to my window.  The image of the squid is actually on the far side; the illusion of being closer than the herons is the same in my house as in my photo.

The composite image is indeed clumsy as a visual metaphor for the interconnectedness of life, but it does tone down the excess sunlight.  It cost nothing beyond what I already spent to help support the NWF, and it looks better than a warthog with zits.

haiku, photography, seasons

Chiaroscuro

Autumn is the best season of the year and also the shortest, unless we submit to calendar tyranny and say that “late fall” includes the leafless gray weeks before the winter solstice.
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

Chiaroscuro_moon_443x449
I have a daylight photo that looks much like a shot of the full moon thru colored leaves, so I can illustrate Chèvrefeuille’s beautiful evocation of true autumn while responding to

Carpe Diem Haiku Experiment #1 an introduction

with a short haiku (in 3-5-3 form) about how short the season is.

© Chèvrefeuille
|light of the full moon
|shines through colored leaves
|at last … autumn

Ending Too Soon
|Wind speeds up!
|Leaves fall in panic!
|Clouds roll in …

haiku, seasons

Another Maple Seed Haiku

This post responds to a CDHK challenge by sharing two haiku about seeing maples consign their seeds to the warm wind: my own and one written by Betty Hayes Albright.
– Gray button (upper left corner) reveals widgets, –
– above post (on phone) or beside it (on desktop). –

In response to CARPE DIEM HAIKU KAI: Carpe Diem Utabukuro #10 Wim Lofvers’ “a maple seed”

In late May of 2015 I happened to be out walking on a perfect day for seeing maples consign their seeds to the warm wind.  Having neither the skill nor the equipment to capture the moment on video, I kept walking and composed an appropriate haiku.

I like to use a haiku to wrap up a discussion that not even Basho could fit into 3 lines.  Having no more to say at that time, I typed the haiku into my computer and left it there.  Now I have a CDHK opportunity for my haiku.  As of this writing, there are 9 responses posted.  From a wealth of good haiku about maple seeds, I will share as a favorite the same favorite (written by Betty Hayes Albright) that is shared in the 5-th response.

Albright’s haiku stands out for me because it is vivid and reads quite naturally as English w/o any apology for squeezing into 5-7-5.  It also uses ordinary capitalization and punctuation, which I prefer over the affectations common in poetry.  At the risk of shooting myself in the foot, I will display it alongside my own haiku at the end of this post.

Seedling_911x655

© Betty Hayes Albright
|The air is spinning!
|Squadrons of maple-copters
|take the fertile earth. 
|Seize the Breeze
|Helicopter seeds
|fall from maples and travel
|far enough, this once.