haiku, humor, philosophy, politics

Vampire Bunny at a Haiku Party

Follow tradition or push the envelope?  Normal or weird?  (Normalcy spiked with weirdness?)  Haiku or senryu?  This crowd does not fret about simplistic dichotomies.  Let’s get some saké and join the party.
(BTW, the [Menu] button atop the vertical black bar reveals the widgets.)

Haiku poems often want (and sometimes need) to interact with images or prose, as in haiga or haibun.  Here is a gathering of ten haiku that could stand alone if they had to.  (Some would rather not.)  They have been invited to come here and interact with just each other, while enjoying some good saké (or whatever).

momokawa_crop_vampire-bunny_840x684

Overlay © Incognito – Russian Federation | 123RF Stock Photo

A haiku inspired by an image may or may not speak to readers who have not seen the image.  It’s hard for the writer to make this call objectively.  That’s OK.  As Stephen Jay Gould often told readers of his articles in Natural History, perfect objectivity is a myth anyway.  (The path from my raw data to “facts” that matter to me depends on my cultural baggage and personal experience.)  Rather than pretend that my judgement calls are objective, I try to compensate for my biases.  In particular, some of my haiku were not invited to the party because they might be too dependent on their inspirations to stand alone.  That’s OK too.  Unlike me, they are not compulsively self-reliant.

Like some of the other guests, October was originally posted in a haiga or haibun context.  That’s why the title it wears as a name tag is also a link.  (When a pale yellow background indicates that several such guests arrived together from the same place, only one of them has a link.)  Click on a link to see the guest(s) interact with an image or some prose that adds to the experience of the haiku.

Seen in Spring
|Kelly green moss on
|rocks near the clear quiet stream
|with water striders
 
|October
|Bright sun and cool air;
|azure skies and pumpkin pies.
|Leaves fall in glory.
 


Who Miscounted?
|This so-called “haiku”
|ignores five-seven-five, so
|it’s not a haiku.

 
|Deciduous
|Lifeless?  No, leafless.
|Trees hold their breath all winter,
|exhale leaves in spring.
 


This is Not Apollo 13
|Is failure an option?
|No, it is a given.
|But we will still try.
 
|No Pots of Gold
|Seek ends of rainbows.
|You will not find them? Okay.
|The quest is enough.
 


Fiscal Responsibility
|Debts rise; incomes fall.
|Hard times demand bold action:
|tax cuts for the rich!
 
|Seize the Breeze
|Helicopter seeds
|fall from maples and travel
|far enough, this once.
 


What’s for Lunch?
|Mosquitoes in flight
|are seen as meat on the hoof
|by a dragonfly.
 
|Vampire Bunny
|With coprophagy
|as the alternative,
|you might suck blood too.
 

6 thoughts on “Vampire Bunny at a Haiku Party

  1. I enjoyed the ‘repertoire ‘ of Haiku subjects – some have a jaunty feel to them, I think. My expectation is that Haikus are about cherry blossom and eternity, so good to be brought up to date. I like ‘Who Miscounted’. On a technical point, is the word ‘called’ one syllable or two ? I’ve written a Haiku with ‘called’ in it, & decided it was two syllables. Please enlighten me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad U liked the diversity of modern haiku.  I wanted to illustrate how varied haiku can be.

      There is a chorus in Handel’s Messiah with the words “and His name shall be called …” that is always sung with 2 syllables for [called], but the word has only 1 syllable in modern US English.  I have sometimes seen lyrics written with an accent mark (as in [calléd]) to indicate that [-ed] should be sung as a separate syllable, despite not being spoken that way today (on my side of The Pond) for many words.  Americans do pronounce the [-ed] in [counted] and [decided], and a linguist could probably describe some regularity about what kind of consonant comes just before [-ed].

      Like

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